Publicly Investing A $20/Ton Carbon tax would create 15,000 – 20,000 lifetime jobs, says New Brunswick groups

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Press Conference – at 10:00am on Tuesday, June 14th at the Saint John Free Public Library, 1 Market Square, Saint John

The Energy Future is now. The rapid expansion of clean energy and building efficiency will create large numbers of local and lifetime jobs across this province.

A coalition of New Brunswick groups kick off the start of their clean energy and efficiency summit by asking Premier Brian Gallant to create a government department called RenewNB.  Set up as a public investment fund, it would oversee the use of a $20/Ton carbon tax revenue to create a massive job creation program by investing into clean energy and building efficiency programs.  This investment strategy would create 15,000 – 20,000 lifetime jobs, eventually wipe out NB Power debt, and generate over $2 Billion in extra revenue for the province once the transition to a low carbon economy is complete.

The following will be included at the head table:

– Mark D’Arcy, Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter
– Garth Hood, certified Passive House consultant in Fredericton
– Sharon Murphy, Team EcoHealth
– Serge Plourde, Vice President-at-large, CUPE NB
– Chris Rouse, Saint John
– David Thompson, Saint John
– Dr. Paula Tippett, Council of Canadians – Saint John chapter

We invite you to our press conference at 10:00am on Tuesday, June 14th at the Saint John Free Public Library, 1 Market Square, Saint John


Update


SAINT JOHN – A coalition of New Brunswick groups kick off the start of their clean energy and efficiency summit by asking Premier Brian Gallant to create a government department called RenewNB. Set up as a public investment fund, it would oversee the use of a $20/Ton carbon tax revenue to create a massive job creation program by investing into clean energy and building efficiency programs. This investment strategy would create 15,000 – 20,000 lifetime jobs, eventually wipe out NB Power debt, and generate over $2 Billion in extra revenue for the province once the transition to a low carbon economy is complete.

“A $20/Ton carbon tax would initially generate $300 million/year to be invested into public energy programs. Instead of giving the money away to private corporations in subsidies, or using the money for general revenue, this money would be transparently invested into publicly-owned renewable energy projects for the benefit of all New Brunswickers. The electricity generated by these projects would then earn 7 cents per kilowatt hour (7cents/kwh) from NB Power, and this revenue that would be reinvested once again by RenewNB. This is less than NB Powers current total cost of 9.1 cents/kwh, so it will help keep rates low and stable.” said Chris Rouse

“Reinvesting profits back into growth is the hallmark of any good business, and the same principles as a well invested RRSP. This would result in a near doubling of the initial $300 million per year to $565 million per year in just 10 years without any additional rate increases. This is due to compound interest.” adds Rouse.

“The concept of reinvesting in environmentally-friendlier energy production and energy efficiency to create a compound interest effect is founded economic theory,” University of New Brunswick economist Rob Moir told Rouse. Dr. Moir said the approach “should be considered by all provinces and not only New Brunswick.”
“CUPE’s National Environmental policy calls for a rapid expansion of clean, renewable and energy delivered by the public sector,” says Serge Plourde, CUPE NB. “Canada must take a leadership role on climate change and help push the world to a brighter, more sustainable future, by moving to a green economy.”

“A flagship project for RenewNB would be to celebrate the centennial of our public utility, NB Power, with investing in the refurbishment of the Musquash Generating Station,” says Saint John resident and retired Fundy Baykeeper David Thompson. “New Brunswick Electric Power Company was originally created in 1920 to build the Musquash dam. All the dams, roads, power line, and west branch water tunnel are already in place. “

“It has been proven, including with New Brunswick examples, that investing energy efficiency in buildings is cost effective and usually the least costly building option – when future energy savings are considered. An energy efficient building will use more local labour & materials, creating more local jobs.” says Garth Hood, a certified Passive House consultant in Fredericton.

“It is not fair to our underemployed workers to delay this huge job creation opportunity any longer,” says Mark D’Arcy, a member of the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians. “Our world leaders decided in Paris last year that we will limit the effects of global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, and it is time we all get to work fulfilling that commitment.”

The Clean Energy East Summit is being held at the Saint John Free Public Library, 1 Market Square on Tuesday, June 14th (10am-4pm) and Wednesday June 15 (12noon-4pm).


The Harmony Project A Response to Aggressive Pipeline Marketing

Transcription of Video by André Faust

Look what they done to my yard ma! The words uttered after a catastrophic environmental disaster cause by Industry and the profiteers.

Today we are launching the harmony project, a pipeline art project throughout over 400 kilometres of proposed pipeline route of the energy east of the pipeline in the Province of New Brunswick, today the people of this province are taking a lead in mapping out the proposed route of this huge 42 inch tar sands pipeline.

This is a public awareness and opposition building campaign. The reason for this campaign is that communities across this province have been kept in the dark about the exact route of the proposed tar sand pipeline and the risk and impact of this pipeline to their communities.

TransCanada, the National Energy board and Brian Gallant’s government have failed to provide even basic information such as easy to read and understandable maps. This is in contrast to the Kinder Morgan trans mountain pipeline proposal on the west coast of Canada where the National Energy board and that company the public can easily access zoomable maps of the pipeline route and easy to read and access detail maps.

Here the TransCanada, National Energy Board, Brian Gallant’s government have failed to provide public meetings. They have failed to provide writes and impacts specific to New Brunswick through province environmental impact assessments, and they have failed to provide even the basic maps of the route through our New Brunswick Communities.

The question that I ask to everyone today. Would you trust a large resource company and government that refuses to answer questions in public? and would you trust large resource company and government that refuses to provide the basic tools and maps to understand where the pipeline is going through their water shed and community?

I really see the Harmony Project, I like just like provide a few closing comments, the Harmony Project really is the people in this province taking command of the situation. The time line has just been announced by the National Energy Board for the Energy East review process, and we have panel meetings starting as early as September this fall here in this province, and TransCanada, the province of New Brunswick, National Energy Board have basically run out of time.
The citizens of this province, the indigenous people who we share this land with we have to take control of the situation.

The Harmony Project I see is a celebration of the intelligence the resilience and the history of this amazing part of the world and Anglophone, francophone we make up a small percentage maybe two or three percent of the human history of this province. The Harmony Project embraces the huge history times an memorial.

We have the creation the tree of life on the Harmony Project poster. The artwork that we are using is from the indigenous culture, and I think that all of us the Anglophone, the Francophone, the indigenous communities are coming together in harmony to show that we are all connected by this huge vast water basin. It is one of the largest watershed on the eastern seaboard and it’s the worst possible location for forty-two-inch tar sand pipeline.


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Poster

Residents, Groups, and Wolastog Grand Council launch a province-wide campaign to install artwork along the proposed Energy East pipeline route

Press Conference – Crown Plaza Fredericton, Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 11:00am

Residents, groups and the Wolastoq Grand Council will launch a province-wide initiative to engage communities across New Brunswick to install artwork along the proposed Energy East pipeline route.  This is an initiative sponsored by the Peace and Friendship Alliance.

The following will be included at the head table:

– Alma Brooks (Wolastoq Grand Council)
– Mark D’Arcy (Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter)
– Leslie Hillman (Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association)
– Don McDonald (resident in the Nashwaak watershed who compiled the co-ordinates for the waterway crossings of the pipeline across New Brunswick)
– Marilyn Merritt-Gray (Belleisle Bay resident)

We invite you to our press conference on Thursday, May 19th at 11:00am at the Crown Plaza Hotel in downtown Fredericton.


 

City Has Made It’s Self Look Foolish Says Mayor Woodside

By André Faust

On Monday 02, 2016 Fredericton city Council convened at their schedule time of 19:30hr and conceded that when the held their private secrete meeting on January 25, 2016 did breach section 10.2 of the municipalities act M-22 which states that what meetings are to be held in public and which meeting can be held in private.

The issue stems from a request to the city from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce to council to write a letter of support for the construction of the Energy East pipeline which the Canadian Chamber of Commerce would forward on to the Prime Minister. It is this item that was passed in close session of council that was outside the confines of section 10.2 of the municipalities act. This item should have first been made public to allow for public input.

Councillor Randy Dickenson ward twelve, that the Council for Canadians for the discovery of this procedural error and making it public.

Councillor Greg Ericson ward 8 moved the motion to rescind the contents of the letter of support, seconded by Randy Dickinson ward 8. After a lengthy discussion the motion for the city to rescind the contents of the letter of support was voted on and carried by a majority vote.

Mayor Brad Woodside concluded this portion of the council with the following closing remark, “We’ve learned our lesson, we’ve apologized to everybody, we made ourselves look foolish.”


Secrecy surrounds City Council’s Letter to Prime Minister Trudeau

Marc D’arcy community organizer gives his reaction to Council not recognizing  the citizens dissatisfaction to the in-camera meeting

By André Faust

In a recent leak it was learned that the Fredericton City Council held an in-camera* session that was held without the public knowledge to draft a letter of support for Energy East to proceed with its pipe line plan. According to the Council of Canadians the city contravened the municipalities act when it held a closed in-camera session on January 25, 2016 to discuss and approve the letter of support that was requested by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, close meetings or in camera meetings according to the municipalities act M-22 are only permissible in matters that are personal, involves litigation, security etc, etc.

In response to the city violation of the act a number of demonstrators attended Monday night’s council meeting in anticipation that the four councilors who opposed the motion to draft the support letter to Prime Minister Trudeau would have moved to have the matter added to the agenda so that the public could be informed of the in camera session and what was discussed. Council was aware to why and the reason that the demonstrators were there, rather than addressing the matter with the demonstrators, council choose to ignore the group who purpose was to address the in camera meeting. The group re acted quietly, stood up and turn their backs to council then quietly without creating a disturbance left.
Following the acceptance of the agenda it was clear that the issue of the letter was not going to be added to the agenda.

What is known about the secret meeting of January 25, 2016 is that councilors John MacDermin, Greg Ericson, Randy Dickinson and Kate Rogers voted against the letter of support, Councilor Marilyn Kerton was not present for this meeting. The motion to authorize the writing of the support letter was moved and seconded by Dan Keenan and Stephen Chase. It is not known at this time if there were any other councilors absent for this meeting.

In the 3 volume report that the New Brunswick Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing stated that 75% of New Brunswickers were very concerned about the impact that fossil fuels would have on the environment, and that a social license at this time to further the expansion of the fossil fuel industry would likely not be attained. That leaves the question to why would council give support without public consultation if at the present the likelihood of a social license is unlikely.


* In camera (/ɪŋˈkæmᵊrə/; Latin: “in a chamber”) is a legal term that means in private. The same meaning is sometimes expressed in the English equivalent: in chambers. Generally, in-camera describes court cases, parts of it, or process where the public and press are not allowed to observe the procedure or process. – Wikipedia