Eradication of Chronic Homelessness in Fredericton

 

By André Faust

The stereotypical view of poverty and homelessness is those individuals are in that position because they choose to be in that position and therefore deserve to be in that position and pay the consequences of their choice. The reality is, that is not the case poverty and chronic homelessness is not entirely due to the individual character type but more so to do with external factors that the individual has absolutely no control over.

The root cause of this ever-increasing homelessness and poverty is that our current local and global economic system has become antiquated and no longer can meet the social needs of both our local communities and global communities. The longer that this obsolete economy is allowed to continue the greater the number of people will fall into a state of poverty and homelessness and the closer that we will come to the tipping point that even those who a enjoying the great wealth and power will eventually also start to lose.

There can only be two possible outcomes either the economic system evolves and adapts to meet the needs of modern society or the system will eventually collapse in which no one will be spared.

While all the stakeholders in Canada are recognising the symptoms of a dying economy, steps are being made to buy time by developing strategies to address both poverty and homelessness. Hopefully, these strategies will buy enough time to allow the economy to evolve to accommodate the needs of the upcoming generation.

Fredericton the capital city of New Brunswick has put forth a workable strategic plan to eliminate Chronic Homelessness in the city of Fredericton. The mandate of the Mayor’s task force on homelessness was to study the problem and come back to council with a plan of action.

The task force consulted with all the stakeholders, the provincial/federal government, the business community, various churches and non-profits to arrive at a workable solution.

On June 12, 2017, the findings and the solutions were presented to council.
The task force reported that in the long term it would be cheaper to develop stable living accommodations to house the homeless than to have these people living on the streets.

Here are some of the recommendation that was outlined in the executive summary of the task force report.

• Reduce parking requirements for Housing First construction where appropriate as this:
· Decreases development costs
· Increases land available for other purposes that better meets community needs

• Donate or lease surplus city-owned remnant properties where appropriate for Housing First developments:
· Many such areas currently under-used
· Transportation and servicing infrastructure already in place

• Amend the definition of “assisted living” to include “permanent supportive/supported housing” as this will avoid the necessity of rezoning that can be expensive and time-consuming
· Will allow churches to more easily build housing on their own land that can be used for Housing First placements

• Provide Housing First participants with subsidised bus passes
· Helps people access much-needed health and social supports
· Helps access education and employment opportunities
· Incentive to remain actively involved in Housing First program

• Conduct an analysis of best practices and regulatory structures for rooming houses
· Least expensive housing option
· Other benefits could be realised

• Raise awareness about the broad community benefits of affordable housing and Housing First through ‘Yes in My Backyard’ education campaign

• Explore the viability of creating an Affordable Housing Land Trust under our municipal structure

• Conduct a process improvement strategy to make it easier for non-profits to participate in affordable housing development

Jeff Richardson reported that the intent is to build 40 units at cost of 1.4 million dollars. The Housing First Fund has been created and as of date has received $500,000.

The down side is that if the economy keeps degrading it is possible that once these 40 units are completed there still may not be enough units to meet the demand at the time of completion.


The Science Delusion – Rupert Sheldrake

Rupert Sheldrake, Ph.D. (born 28 June 1942) is a biologist and author of more than 80 scientific papers and ten books. A former Research Fellow of the Royal Society, he studied natural sciences at Cambridge University, where he was a Scholar of Clare College, took a double first class honours degree and was awarded the University Botany Prize. He then studied philosophy and history of science at Harvard University, where he was a Frank Knox Fellow, before returning to Cambridge, where he took a Ph.D. in biochemistry. He was a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge, where he was Director of Studies in biochemistry and cell biology. As the Rosenheim Research Fellow of the Royal Society, he carried out research on the development of plants and the ageing of cells in the Department of Biochemistry at Cambridge University.

While at Cambridge, together with Philip Rubery, he discovered the mechanism of polar auxin transport, the process by which the plant hormone auxin is carried from the shoots towards the roots.

From 1968 to 1969, based in the Botany Department of the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, he studied rain forest plants. From 1974 to 1985 he was Principal Plant Physiologist and Consultant Physiologist at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in Hyderabad, India, where he helped develop new cropping systems now widely used by farmers. While in India, he also lived for a year and a half at the ashram of Fr Bede Griffiths in Tamil Nadu, where he wrote his first book, A New Science of Life.

From 2005-2010 he was the Director of the Perrott-Warrick Project funded from Trinity College,Cambridge. He is a Fellow of Schumacher College , in Dartington, Devon, a Fellow of the Institute of Noetic Sciences near San Francisco, and a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute in Connecticut.

He lives in London with his wife Jill Purce and two sons.

He has appeared in many TV programs in Britain and overseas, and was one of the participants (along with Stephen Jay Gould, Daniel Dennett, Oliver Sacks, Freeman Dyson and Stephen Toulmin) in a TV series called A Glorious Accident, shown on PBS channels throughout the US. He has often taken part in BBC and other radio programmes. He has written for newspapers such as the Guardian, where he had a regular monthly column, The Times, Sunday Telegraph, Daily Mirror, Daily Mail, Sunday Times, Times Educational Supplement, Times Higher Education Supplement and Times Literary Supplement, and has contributed to a variety of magazines, including New Scientist, Resurgence, the Ecologist and the Spectator.


Books by Rupert Sheldrake:
A New Science of Life: The Hypothesis of Formative Causation (1981). New edition 2009 (in the US published as Morphic Resonance)
The Presence of the Past: Morphic Resonance and the Habits of Nature (1988)
The Rebirth of Nature: The Greening of Science and God (1992)
Seven Experiments that Could Change the World: A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Revolutionary Science (1994) (Winner of the Book of the Year Award from the British Institute for Social Inventions)
Dogs that Know When Their Owners are Coming Home, and Other Unexplained Powers of Animals (1999) (Winner of the Book of the Year Award from the British Scientific and Medical Network)
The Sense of Being Stared At, And Other Aspects of the Extended Mind (2003)
The Science Delusion (2012, published in the US as Science Set Free)


 

Putin educates Megyn Kelly on Syria, chemical weapons & terrorism

Re-blogged from RT

Russian President Vladimir Putin rejected the insinuation by NBC News correspondent Megyn Kelly that the Syrian government was behind the April chemical attack, putting the blame on terrorists who orchestrated a provocation. Using terrorists as proxies is a bad idea, Putin said, pointing out how the US created Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan to fight the USSR, only to end up with 9/11.


Fredericton City Council Talks the Talk About Eradication of Homelessness but Fails to Deliver

By André Faust

Just when you think you have seen it all, then bang something out the blue is thrown at you. The city of Fredericton has boasted that they were the leaders in fighting poverty and homelessness in the city of Fredericton, Mayor O’Brien even created the task force on homelessness.

Here is a direct quote take from Mayor Mike Obrien’s bio which can be found on the city of Fredericton web page.

“Mike has been in the forefront of promoting Housing First, a proven model to eradicate chronic homelessness in his City. This effort has put Fredericton on the path to being the first City in New Brunswick to eliminate chronic homelessness.”
That objective has become totally meaningless. The City had the opportunity to show it’s commitment to the eradication of homelessness and really shine as a progressive city in the fight against homelessness. But they blew it!
Instead, they passed a motion that will place a minimum for individuals on the street because their landlord in his act of compassion for those socially disadvantaged individuals allowed an additional four people to live in his room house after being asked by several organisations to help these desolate people. In his act of kindness, he did not think about by-laws and regulations. He put people first.

Well that didn’t go over well with town council, the issue for refusing application to convert his duplex into to a triplex so wasn’t because his building didn’t meet building or fire codes, on the contrary, his building exceeded the legal requirements The Problem is the as a result of act of humanity where he provided sanctuary to people who couldn’t wait for a lengthy bureaucratic process. They need help now, not 6 months down the road or a year down the road their need was Immediate.

Get this and again I quote from the city’s web page ” Councillor Price is a proud supporter of the city’s drive to end homeless” Yet he reprimanded Keith young for not following procedures, Eric Price essentially told Landlord Keith young he was voting against the application for conversion because Keith Young didn’t follow the rules, the process. Price basically told to Young we have to follow the rules and so do you. Obviously, Price has diminished memory capacity or is showing the early symptoms of dementia. Because right before the election council had to apologise for breaking their own rules in regards to holding an illegal meeting. Or when the Fredericton City Police falsified document to the internet provider to retrieve personal information from Blogger Charles Leblanc. In The Bernard Richards report, she admitted that the documents were false, but she apologised and said yes it was wrong, but it was due to a bad “Cut” and Paste”.

So it appears that if you are the decision makers of this city you can break your own laws, and all you need to do is apologise and it justifies the action. Well, Eric price didn’t accept Mr Young’s apology for his oversight, even though Mr Young’s reason was for compassionate reasons. His application was rejected for a minor technicality.

All this hype about Fredericton to eradicate homelessness genuine or are the players just creating a halo effect to make themselves look good to advance their careers.


Self-Deterministic Theory, Logic, Emotions And The Police

By André Faust (May 02, 2017)

I am always in a constant battle with myself between logic and emotion. From life experience, most of my mistakes in life were the results of decisions arising from emotional responses, rather than those based on logic.

I ‘ve come to realise that logic is only a structured systematic thought process for example if condition A exists then the result has to be this. or if you remove every possible explanation and you are left with one, that has to be the correct one.

Logic by itself, without emotion, cannot keep our species alive because is only an abstract thought process and this thought process is not a drive for survival, while the process is useful in developing strategies to get what we want it is not directly responsible for our survival.

Emotions, on the other hand, seems to be the main driving force to keep our species alive and at the individual level, it is emotions that dictate why we behave as we do. Related to emotions and why we behave there are three other properties, motivation and drive which can work for us or can work against us depending on what we are responding to.

One of the best theoretical frameworks that I have found as a base to understand the relationship between behaviour and emotion is the self-determination theory.

The beauty of the self-determination theory is that it simplifies our emotional drives into three basic needs. 1. Autonomy. Is the universal urge to be causal agents of one’s own life and act in harmony with one’s integrated self. 2. Competence, Seek to control the outcome and experience mastery and 3. Relatedness, Is the universal want to interact, be connected to, and experience caring for others. (Ryan, & Deci, 2000).

The implication of the theory is that if any, any combination or all are not met, the chances of experiencing negative emotions such as anxiety, fear, depression and others is greatly increased. In other words, a state of unhappiness and if these are not met between people conflict can arise.

In an upcoming video, I will be discussing police aggression, investigation and interrogation of innocent people using the logic of the theory of self-determination. The discussion will look at two frames of reference one from the police and the other from the person(s) frame of reference and how the interaction between the two can have serious negative impact on the lives of the innocent person.


Reference:

Ryan, R., & Deci, E. (2000). Self-Determination Theory and the Facilitation of Intrinsic Motivation, Social Development, and Well-Being (1st ed.). American Psychologist. Retrieved from https://selfdeterminationtheory.org/SDT/documents/2000_RyanDeci_SDT.pdf